The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell

It’s been far too long since I last blogged – too many time constraints, poor time management, etc – which is a shame, for, dear reader, I have read some simply marvellous books, both in the last months of 2017, and in 2018. And instead of blogging about them, I have simply tweeted about them, and spoken about them, and…rated them on GoodReads. Which never feels like quite enough.


But I’ve got carried away. Today, I’m writing about The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell, that spooky book you saw all over Twitter last year. There was a suggestion that the book was very scary and that those of a weak disposition should stay away. I, knowing myself to be of a weak disposition (not sleeping after reading The Shining, fainting whilst reading The Shining Girls, The Life and Loves of a She-Devil and The Witchfinder’s Sister, amongst other books) avoided it. But then, I popped into my local library, and spotted it there, temptingly positioned under ‘P’. I couldn’t resist…

The Silent Companions opens with Elsie Bainbridge, locked away in an asylum, accused of murder, but unable, or unwilling to speak and defend herself. And already, we know that her story will not end well. The narrative then jumps back to a year or so previously, with Elsie, newly widowed, newly pregnant, moving into her late husband’s crumbling estate, with only his boring cousin Sarah for company. Elsie explores the house, discovering a locked garret, which contains a hidden 200-year old diary and a strangely life-like and life-size wooden figure, known as a silent companion. Sarah starts reading the diary, excited to learn about her ancestors, and learns about a 17th century noble family with their eye on the king’s favour, with only their youngest daughter, a mute, standing in their way. And then odd things start happening around the large rambling house. The companion appears around the house, and apparently multiplies. And the companions’ eyes seem to move, following them around. The resentful servants playing tricks on them? Elsie’s mind, addled with grief? Or something more sinister? 

Events build to a terrifying crescendo, with all the terror of Stephen King’s hedge animals, and all the atmosphere of Sarah Perry’s The Essex Serpent. It’s a breathless, agonising read, that you can’t bear to keep reading, but also can’t put down. Highly recommended, but don’t do what I did, and decide to tackle the last hundred pages at about 11.30 at night…

The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell is out now, published by Bloomsbury. 

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