Dark Pines by Will Dean

There’s really something to be said for reviewing books when you actually read them, rather than some months later. Nonetheless, let’s give it a go. I had heard much about this exciting Sweden-based debut from the oh-so charming Will Dean. Liz (of the ‘Loves Books’) fame had been talking it up for quite some time, and the premise (one word – Swedish) sounded intriguing. So one cold January evening, I curled up and took a look.

Dark Pines’ protagonist is Tuva Moodyson, a young deaf reporter working in the remote town of Gavrik. She is used to covering local stories, ‘your daughter scoring in a hockey match or your neighbour growing the town’s longest carrot’, but when a body is found in the forest, eyes missing, in a manner similar to another case known as the Medusa case twenty years ago, Tuva senses that this could be the story that makes her name. But between visits to her sick mother, navigating the resentful locals who don’t want negative stories damaging their town, and even keeping on top of laundry, nothing about this story will be simple.

The suspects are all weirder than the next, and include a keen hunter, two terrifying sisters who carve unnerving wooden trolls, and a militant anti-hunting vegetarian possibly taking revenge on the many hunters in the area. Tuva already has a fear of the forest, let alone with one of them on her tail… Nothing about the trail makes sense, and as more bodies pile up, Tuva is running out of time.

Dark Pines is a thrilling and clever mystery, but what made it outstanding to me is the unique and interesting lead character of Tuva, and the completely exquisite, evocative and atmospheric writing. You can almost smell the damp pine needles, and feel the boggy thickness of the air as you read. A very exciting debut, and I look forward to reading whatever Will Dean produces from the forest in which he lives (obvs).

Dark Pines by Will Dean is out now, published by Point Blank.


The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell

It’s been far too long since I last blogged – too many time constraints, poor time management, etc – which is a shame, for, dear reader, I have read some simply marvellous books, both in the last months of 2017, and in 2018. And instead of blogging about them, I have simply tweeted about them, and spoken about them, and…rated them on GoodReads. Which never feels like quite enough.

But I’ve got carried away. Today, I’m writing about The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell, that spooky book you saw all over Twitter last year. There was a suggestion that the book was very scary and that those of a weak disposition should stay away. I, knowing myself to be of a weak disposition (not sleeping after reading The Shining, fainting whilst reading The Shining Girls, The Life and Loves of a She-Devil and The Witchfinder’s Sister, amongst other books) avoided it. But then, I popped into my local library, and spotted it there, temptingly positioned under ‘P’. I couldn’t resist…

The Silent Companions opens with Elsie Bainbridge, locked away in an asylum, accused of murder, but unable, or unwilling to speak and defend herself. And already, we know that her story will not end well. The narrative then jumps back to a year or so previously, with Elsie, newly widowed, newly pregnant, moving into her late husband’s crumbling estate, with only his boring cousin Sarah for company. Elsie explores the house, discovering a locked garret, which contains a hidden 200-year old diary and a strangely life-like and life-size wooden figure, known as a silent companion. Sarah starts reading the diary, excited to learn about her ancestors, and learns about a 17th century noble family with their eye on the king’s favour, with only their youngest daughter, a mute, standing in their way. And then odd things start happening around the large rambling house. The companion appears around the house, and apparently multiplies. And the companions’ eyes seem to move, following them around. The resentful servants playing tricks on them? Elsie’s mind, addled with grief? Or something more sinister? 

Events build to a terrifying crescendo, with all the terror of Stephen King’s hedge animals, and all the atmosphere of Sarah Perry’s The Essex Serpent. It’s a breathless, agonising read, that you can’t bear to keep reading, but also can’t put down. Highly recommended, but don’t do what I did, and decide to tackle the last hundred pages at about 11.30 at night…

The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell is out now, published by Bloomsbury. 

The Burning Girl by Claire Messud

I find books exploring friendships between teenage girls fascinating to read. They shine a certain clarity on the trials and tribulations of my own teenage years, as well as bringing back memories both joyous and otherwise. Even if my own teenage friendships were less fraught than that of Julia and Cassie, the ‘Burning Girl’ of the title. 

Julia and Cassie have been friends since nursery school, sharing everything, including a love of Lady Gaga, and a volunteering job at a kennel. But there is a gulf between the two of them that will be more keenly felt over the years – whilst Julia was raised in a happy middle-class family, Cassie is from a single parent family, after the death of her father, and increasingly clashes with her mother. Over the years, in secondary school, the pair start to drift apart. But Cassie, increasingly affected by her mother’s new relationship, also begins to wonder how much of what her mother has told her is the truth. Julia can only hope for her old friend as she sets off in search of her ‘guardian angel’ she’s certain is still out there. 

Claire Messud brilliantly captures young friendships: the long-term plans, the bad behaviour you drag each other into, the secrets shared, but also the small hurts a friend can inflict, to the pain of drifting away from your closest friend, and the shock that you don’t know everything about them. She’s also very sharp on growing up as a young woman, and becoming increasingly aware of the dangers of being female – I vividly remember a teacher recommending we get rape alarms, and swapping tips on how to walk home safely (‘hairspray doubles as pepper spray!’ ‘If you hold your keys between your knuckles…’). 

The Burning Girl took me right back to the growing pains of my schooldays – but don’t let that put you off! I’d heartily recommend this book to anyone – heartbreakingly sad, though often funny, and breathtakingly real. 

The Burning Girls by Claire Messud is out now, published by Fleet. 

All The Wicked Girls by Chris Whitaker 

Chris Whitaker is one of those authors I’ve been wanting to read for at least a year now, partially to get Liz Barnsley (book influencer extraordinaire of Liz Loves Books fame) off my back, but partially because it sounds like he’s quite good. So when my colleague received a copy the other week, it seemed appropriate, nay, essential, to steal it.  

Summer Ryan is the shining light of Grace, Alabama. Unlike her troubled twin sister Raine (clever weather-related wordplay there), she’s a devout churchgoer, and a musical prodigy whose cello performances have moved the town to tears. But now she’s gone missing. Could she have run away? Or is she one of the so-called Briar Girls, teenaged-girls living in Briar County who have been abducted by the mysterious being known as the Bird?  

Unconvinced that the alcoholic police chief Black will succeed in bringing Summer home, or even that he believes she’s really in trouble, Raine enlists the deep-hearted teenage wannabe police officer Noah and his loyal friend Purv to help her investigate. Meanwhile, an angry black cloud hovers over the town, promising a storm, and exacerbating the already-heightened tensions. The whole town is teeming with secrets, and with everyone on high alert, they’re likely to rise to the surface. And between chapters, Summer tells us her own version of events that led to her disappearance. 

All The Wicked Girls is a gripping thriller, but also a deeply emotional story with a big heart and characters you’ll cry over. It’s a portrayal of a town left behind in an America which has apparently never been so prosperous, set in the late 80s’ but equally relevant to today. Although the town is meant to pull together as a community, an undercurrent of violence simmers constantly. And yet, we also have astonishing scenes of kindness and love, such Noah waiting in Purv’s back garden to await a sign that his friend has survived a beating from his father. It’s a thriller that explores the worst excesses of organised religion, but also the positives aspects of faith. I definitely sensed a Twin Peaks influence (but the bits from the first series I could get on board with rather than more recent episodes… “What’s going on? Are they miners?! WHAT’S GOING ON?!”) in the idea that not everything can be explained away, and sometimes things just happen. 

I’ll be stealing (more theft… Maybe Chris is a bad influence on me?) the copy of Tall Oaks I gave my father for Christmas, and look forward to reading whatever Chris Whitaker has to offer. Highly highly recommended! 

All The Wicked Girls by Chris Whitaker is out now, published by Zaffre. 

Ngaio Marsh blog tour: In Dark Places by Michael Bennett

I was asked to review In Dark Places as part of a blog tour for the Ngaio Marsh Awards, and, I won’t lie, true crime is not really my thing. Nevertheless, I agreed, and ploughed on. 

In 1992, Susan Burdett was raped and murdered in her own home. About a year later, a 17 year old car thief named Teina Pora confessed to the police, and was jailed for life. Over the years, his lawyer pointed out the various holes in the case but a jury couldn’t get past the fact that Teina confessed. Why would he confess, unless he did it? Even though there was, like, actually, NO EVIDENCE! Years later, Tim McKinnel, an ex-cop turned private investigator, decides to look into a case which never quite sat right with him. 

It’s hard to explain quite what makes this book so good. You’re devastated by Teina Pora’s life, who despite everything, is a sweet, if law-breaking, family-man teenager. As any evidence that was brought against the teenager is demolished, the fact that his confession might have been false is the one thing that a jury will struggle to accept. And whilst Michael Bennett convincingly, and heartbreakingly talks us through the horrific miscarriage of justice that convicted Teina, he never loses sight of the main victim, Susan herself. 

I defy readers to get through In Dark Places and not feel the need to go around telling everyone they meet about the shocking miscarriage of justice. Pity the poor Kiwi woman I met in my running group last week… (‘Wait, you don’t know about Teina Pora?! Well…’) And honestly, even if you don’t read true crime, read this true crime. It’s truly something special, and a story that needs to be told. 

In Dark Places: The Confessions of Teina Pora and an Ex-Cop’s Fight for Justice by Michael Bennett is out now, and is shortlisted for a Ngaio Marsh Award 

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

A few years ago on holiday, I read Celeste Ng’s extraordinary literary thriller Everything I Never Told You, a powerful story centred around a Chinese-American family living in Ohio, whose teenage daughter goes missing. Beautifully, and subtly written, it was less of a whodunnit than the painfully affecting story of a family, and their unspoken secrets. Needless to say,  I was delighted to stumble across a proof copy of Little Fires Everywhere.

Little Fires Everywhere opens with the revelation that Isabelle, the youngest and most unstable of the Richardson family, has ‘finally gone around the bend’, and burned down the house. As the family watches the house burn, the story flicks back to the previous year, to the arrival of Mia Warren and her teenage daughter Pearl, who rented a flat from Elena Richardson.

Mia is an artist, who flits around the country, staying just long enough to complete her latest photographic project, before leaving it all behind and settling elsewhere. But this is the last time, she has assured her daughter Pearl, who is desperate for stability. And when they arrive in Shaker Heights, Pearl is captivated by the Richardson family, and they equally by her and Mia. From Moody, the younger boy who falls in love with her, to the oldest daughter Lexie, whose simplistic and judgemental attitude could represent that of Shaker Heights, to Isabelle, the youngest, who finds long-sought after acceptance in Mia. But Elena, whose ‘guiding principal is following the rules,’ and who only rents ‘to people who she felt were deserving but who had, for one reason or another, not quite gotten a fair shot in life,’ feels a direct threat from Mia’s ambivalence to their neatly organised, and selectively philanthropic lives. Nonetheless, they muddle pleasantly along until a custody battle breaks out in the town over the adoption of a Chinese-American baby by a white couple. Mia and Elena find themselves on opposite sides of the battle lines, and in retaliation, Elena sets out to solve the mystery of her tenant’s past – a decision which will have shocking and unforseeable consequences.

Shaker Heights, where the author grew up, is brilliantly drawn – far more nuanced than your average literary symbol of conformity. It’s a bastion of liberal progression, where rules are laid out for everything, from the colours you are entitled to paint your house, to the right way to take out your rubbish. A complacently self-satisfied community, it’s almost Stepford-like, if Stepford had a really good state school system and was quite pleased with its ‘post-racial’ status. It’s a society that Pearl, with few other reference points, is happy to be a part of, whilst Mia is much more suspicious of it. An undercurrent of danger runs throughout – we’re never allowed to forget that the story will end in flames but it’s also hard to actively dislike even the most destructive of characters – and I don’t mean Izzy here – as they’re all so well-meaning.

Little Fires Everywhere is a nuanced, thought-provoking, and breathlessly readable story, exploring what makes a mother, and whether making mistakes is a privilege. However, it’s also, often, wildly funny, with genuine laugh out loud moments, which lifts this already clever, thoughtful novel into a wonderfully enjoyable read. Wholeheartedly recommended.

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ing is published by Little, Brown on 14th September.

Sweet Little Lies by Caz Frear

In 1998, Catrina was on holiday in Mulderrin, Ireland with her family, when the beautiful 17 year old Maryanne Doyle vanished. Catrina had seen the effect Maryanne had on the boys and the men in the area, including her own father. But then after she went missing, her father told a lie to the police about whether or not he knew her. To eight-year-old Catrina, this could only mean one thing, and her perception of her brilliant, funny, generous father who she idolised changes permanently. 

Years later, Cat is now a Detective Constable in the Metropolitan police, determined to escape the shadow of her petty-criminal father, and still convinced that he was responsible for the disappearance of Maryanne Doyle. Then one night, in the run-up to Christmas, the body of a woman is found near her dad’s pub in Spitalfields, and Cat fears the worst. Whilst she passionately wants justice for the dead women, she’s equally desperate to avoid her father being brought in, and having her family exposed. If this sounds straightforward, I assure you it isn’t. What follows is a killer crime debut – an already gripping premise that turns into an even more thrilling tale, packed with twists and turns, which you won’t be able to put down. Every time you think you’re on solid ground, another revelation is thrown into the mix, building up to a clever and devastating climax I wouldn’t have ever imagined. 

One thing I sometimes find a bit difficult about police procedures is that often the ‘team’ scenes slow down the action. This was not an issue in Sweet Little Lies. The team of officers are well-drawn and enthralling in their own right – from DS Luigi Parnell, who Cat knowingly clings to as a surrogate father, to the fearsome DCI Steele, whose maternal instincts towards Cat are somewhat less appreciated. In fact, whenever we left the station, I found myself missing them. Cat too is a terrifically compelling character who I rooted for, gunning for her to do the right thing. She’s both manipulative and vulnerable, often told off for over-empathising with victims, and impossible not to sympathise with. 

I’d definitely recommend this complex, convincing and deeply satisfying thriller about family bonds, and how far we would go to protect the ones we love, in spite of everything. 

Huge thanks to the endlessly super Katherine Armstrong for pushing this into my greedy little hands.

Sweet Little Lies by Caz Frear is published by Zaffre.