Ngaio Marsh blog tour: In Dark Places by Michael Bennett

I was asked to review In Dark Places as part of a blog tour for the Ngaio Marsh Awards, and, I won’t lie, true crime is not really my thing. Nevertheless, I agreed, and ploughed on. 


In 1992, Susan Burdett was raped and murdered in her own home. About a year later, a 17 year old car thief named Teina Pora confessed to the police, and was jailed for life. Over the years, his lawyer pointed out the various holes in the case but a jury couldn’t get past the fact that Teina confessed. Why would he confess, unless he did it? Even though there was, like, actually, NO EVIDENCE! Years later, Tim McKinnel, an ex-cop turned private investigator, decides to look into a case which never quite sat right with him. 

It’s hard to explain quite what makes this book so good. You’re devastated by Teina Pora’s life, who despite everything, is a sweet, if law-breaking, family-man teenager. As any evidence that was brought against the teenager is demolished, the fact that his confession might have been false is the one thing that a jury will struggle to accept. And whilst Michael Bennett convincingly, and heartbreakingly talks us through the horrific miscarriage of justice that convicted Teina, he never loses sight of the main victim, Susan herself. 

I defy readers to get through In Dark Places and not feel the need to go around telling everyone they meet about the shocking miscarriage of justice. Pity the poor Kiwi woman I met in my running group last week… (‘Wait, you don’t know about Teina Pora?! Well…’) And honestly, even if you don’t read true crime, read this true crime. It’s truly something special, and a story that needs to be told. 

In Dark Places: The Confessions of Teina Pora and an Ex-Cop’s Fight for Justice by Michael Bennett is out now, and is shortlisted for a Ngaio Marsh Award 

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